Fangirling... at my age?!!!!

Sherlock + flirting with men

I wanted to say I really enjoy seeing your gifs on my dash on a regular basis, it's really nice that somebody is giffing this show and putting it up here, I wouldn't have even watched this show if I hadn't seen these gifs and now I think it's one of the best shows I've ever seen (and the gifs are such good quality considering how old this show is!) so thank you!
Anonymous

channybatch:

thejuniorgazette:

Thank you so much, darling! I’m so happy you’re enjoying them <3

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'… and now I think it's one of the best shows I've ever seen…'
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with one of the strongest teenage female leading character
(even though that character’s attitude reminds me a bit of Sherlock)
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with a crush on the coolest guy ever wich causes a lot of (sexual) tension
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but they get there
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with a great team
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the ‘spot-the-guest-actors’
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with clever jokes
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and some drama
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and back to the jokes
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and sometimes someone jumps of a building
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and did I mention Sherlock?
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so yes, Lynda is a bit extreme and needs her ‘conductor of light’
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the show was written by a 28-year old dude who won a BAFTA for this
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So yeah, there are some Doctor Who stuff sneaked in too


ohw, and don’t forget
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channybatch:

Nothing’s happening in my private life.


                                       I don’t even have one.

channybatch:

I don’t know, I’m too far away.

Friendly Fire / Silence in the Library

channybatch:

Stromae can change from woman to man in a split second

channybatch:

Stromae can change from woman to man in a split second

welovethebeekeeper:

gloriascott93:

mild-lunacy:

onthelosingside:

Let’s not talk about how much Moffat adores William Goldman and The Princess Bride, wouldn’t want to lend any credence to TJLC or anything ……..

One of my favorite things about LSIT’s Princess Bride theory is how it fits in with the sherlockstoriesproject, ‘cause there are just so many fairy stories (and creation myths) with echoes in BBC Sherlock, which I’ve written about before (many times). And I think it’s got to be conscious/intentional on some level in a narrative where the protagonist is canonically a ‘dragon slayer’ and his sidekick is his ‘damsel in distress’, while the main villain has established connections with the two-faced god of life and death, as sherlockedaspergirl noted. I think that aside from any direct inspiration, there’s also definitely some Jungian archetypal undercurrents driving the narrative. I love that you can see Sherlock’s ‘death’ and ‘resurrection’ in the context of Christ or Westley: choose your adventure.

A rambling tangential aside…

"With a glow of admiration I watched Holmes unrolling his case of instruments and choosing his tool with the calm, scientific accuracy of a surgeon who performs a delicate operation. I knew that the opening of safes was a particular hobby with him, and I understood the joy which it gave him to be confronted with this green and gold monster, the dragon which held in its maw the reputations of many fair ladies. Turning up the cuffs of his dress-coat — he had placed his overcoat on a chair — Holmes laid out two drills, a jemmy, and several skeleton keys.”

- from ACD’s The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton. Watson describing Holmes breaking into Milverton’s safe to steal back the letters being used to blackmail women. 

Make of this what you will but in terms of intentionality, I think it’s worthwhile noting that the dragon slayer/ damsel in distress reference in HLV is not only a very specific ACD canon reference to Milverton but it is an *altered* canon reference. Placed as it is in the plot, before they enter Appledore, rather than initially being used in direct parallel with the above quote, the dragon slayer reference is first applied in wider sense - to all of England, “here be dragons”, and then answered at Appledore by Magnussen making the “damsel in distress” needing rescued more specific, referring not to Mary (a lady whose reputation is being held in the dragon’s maw) but instead to John.

What is perhaps a bit intriguing is that here we have Magnussen - a peddler of lies for profit who admits he has no care for facts apparently telling the truth through a narrative archetype. A large part of what one thinks of Mary surely rests on whether we think Magnussen’s “bad girl” assessment is an honest one, or whether, as with Lord Smallwood, it’s a dishonest twisting of the facts to his advantage. Is he trying to provoke John as a test? To see how far his loyalty to Mary will go even if she is a “bad girl” (anything but a fair lady). But what we do know is that as John stares at the video of him being dragged from the flames by Sherlock, we are being given proof: Magnussen put John in the bonfire to test his position in the pressure chain. And Sherlock proved the chain was solid.

The entire Appledore sequence is like a reverse of ACD canon: while in ACD’s version has a house shrouded in almost complete darkness, Holmes and Watson creeping through in masks, holding hands, having no direct confrontation with Milverton and getting away with their “crime”, escaping the police, in HLV they arrive announced, in broad daylight, unmasked (their faces and emotions fully on display), have a direct confrontation with Magnuessen and the “crime” has an audience - Sherlock commits murder in full view of the law. There’s no escaping over the back wall here.

Magnussen then is indeed like the safe of letters, except without an actual safe/vault but instead a mind palace. He is - as an embodiment of the safe - the dragon. But there’s that specific alteration to the story, because from the dragon’s perspective he is casting John as the one needing rescued. And rather than being under Sherlock’s control the tables are turned and Magnussen is doing the expert lock-picking.

And what is perhaps most intriguing is that they didn’t need to write it like this, they chose to. The Milverton break in sequence is one of the most breathless and suspenseful in all of canon - it could have been directly lifted. But it’s not. It’s completely altered, like day is to night. It is echoed in the break in at Magnussen’s office with him whimpering on the floor as Mary (the woman in black) standing over him with a gun - the blackmailed woman rescuing herself. But here at Appledore the Milverton denouement is utterly altered. While Magnussen flicks John’s face, for example, the writers could have very easily cast Mary as the “damsel in distress” in the dialogue. But they don’t. Magnussen frames his power over Mary as having the potential to destroy *John’s* life - which is of course applying pressure to an onlooking Sherlock. This entire sequence is a performance of power over Sherlock. Sherlock kills Magnussen because Magnussen has won: he has John in his maw and there is no way out. There is nothing left for Sherlock to do but literally slay him. And in the process fall on his own sword. He wins the battle but loses the war. This is the *Pyrrhic* victory. He saves the damsel and loses her him in the process. He will be banished from the kingdom as punishment.

HLV  manages to echo MILV but also completely subvert it. The writers chose these alterations. Instead of the success of MILV, with the dragon slayed and everyone getting away with it in the name of true justice, the writers here have Sherlock win by losing. Or is it lose by winning? How? By exposing in broad daylight and under the glare of helicopter spot lights what Sherlock will do for the sake of John Watson. Look how he cares… a flaw also known as human error. A flaw that Sherlock denies - lifting the gun to shoot Magnussen - by asserting that he is a sociopath. He always gets the last word. But the truth has been outed - Magnussen in some sense wins this battle of mind games in his death. And we know Sherlock’s claim to sociopathy is an empty one. He is slaying the dragon for John. Human error for all to see. And to underscore it we have Mycroft seeing Sherlock the Pyrrhic hero without his mask - a small frightened boy with his emotions streaming down his face.

Sometimes the intentionality of the narrative is not so much found in the adherence to ACD canon but the chosen subversion and alteration of it.

Good God Gloria that is wonderful, I salute you for that one.

If you have never watched ‘Press Gang’, the very first show Steven Moffat wrote (and won BAFTA’s with it) you can see he always had Sherlock on his mind when writing Lynda Day, the head character. And must I say that her conductor of light, her trustfull companion Spike mentions to her that he would kill a dragon for her…. 

carryonmy-waywardassbutt:

channybatch:

channybatch:

channybatch:

with not much money, tried to ‘update’ our kitchen from the fifties, but wanted to keep a little of that vintage look.

then I added this poster and only tumblr will understand

or tumblr will not

scuse me, I know I’m no Van Gogh but I painted those walls, ceiling and kitchen door cabinets all by myself

I even went to England to buy this poster

this deserves a little credit

OMG I have same poster hahaa

WOW 12 notes!!!
my needs are  fulfilled